Category Archives: Drawings

The Encounter – Drawings from Leonardo to Rembrandt at the National Portrait Gallery, London

The Encounter at the National Portrait Gallery

The Encounter – another fascinating exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery of 48 drawings by the masters from Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) to Rembrandt (1606-1669).

It shouldn’t surprise me but surprise me it did – seeing how little we’ve changed in the last six centuries. The clothes – especially the hats and hairstyles – may have changed but the expressions, so brilliantly captured by these masters, remain the same.

Old Woman wearing a Ruff and Cap attributed to Jacob Jordaens 1593-1678

This old woman is so brilliantly drawn with the muscles of her cheek pushed up by the fist she is leaning on is one of my favourites. One of the reasons for wearing ruffs was to hide swollen tuberculous neck glands, rare now in the Western word and we don’t wear caps but you could see her or her sister in any present day gathering of old ladies.

 

A souvenir from the small shop in the exhibition

 

I am always a sucker for shops in art galleries. The National Portrait Gallery has a small shop attached to the current exhibition as well as the large shop at the front of the gallery – both full of things you don’t need but must have.

The women on the bag look very serious but if they broke into a smile you could see their like in the streets of London.

A few of Rembrandt’s drawings on the cover of a sketch book

 

A brilliant capture of male faces in these sketches by Rembrandt. I find them very reminiscent of Hokusai’s manga drawings.

I was pleased to find that the exhibition was quite small so I felt up to visiting the portraits on show from the BP Portrait Award 2017 – reviewed here next week.

 

Canaletto and The Art of Venice at the Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace

Also with paintings and drawings by his contemporaries

Another fascinating exhibition of paintings and drawings from the Queen’s own collection.

I can take or leave Canaletto’s paintings – they all look too similar to me and too yellow – nothing like the colourful Venice of my memory – but I loved his drawings – especially the early designs for the theatre., where he started his career. His drawings show his great sense of humour as well as his compassion.

 

A view of the Rialto

His paintings and drawings of Venice would have been a must for wealthy Englishmen making their Grand Tour.

Interesting drawings and paintings by his contemporaries included some by Sebastiano and Marco Ricci, Francesco Zuccarelli, Rosalba Carriera, Pietro Longhi and Giovanni Batista Piazzetta.

We have George III to thank for the collection. He bought Joseph Smith’s entire stock for £20,000 in 1762 – some 15,000 books, 500 paintings, drawings etc.

I personally prefer Canaletto’s paintings of London and its surroundings, carried out during his repeated visits to England 1746-1755, but obviously not included in this exhibition.