Category Archives: Piccadilly

Another addiction – coffee

The Nespresso shop in Piccadilly, London
The Nespresso shop in Piccadilly, London

When I go to Waterstone’s in Piccadilly (see my post on September 8th) to buy books I walk though to Regent Street to the Nespresso Shop to top up on my coffee capsules and have a free cup of coffee.  It’s somehow just a bit more delicious than at home.

Waiting for coffee
Waiting for coffee

In the early days at the Nespresso concession in Selfridges anyone could ask for a cup of coffee but now at the Nespresso shop you have either to show your Nespresso card or  have bought something. Maybe too many people just wandered over for free coffee.

A Pixie machine
A Pixie machine

My first Nespresso machine was all singing and dancing. It could froth milk as well as make coffee and took up a lot of room. When it finally died I bought the much simpler Pixie which has a slightly smaller water reservoir but is easy to use and you can still make either a small expresso or a larger cup automatically. My daughter Louise is happy with one you have to watch but I know if there weren’t a button that delivered just enough to fill the cup I would constantly get caught up in something else and it would overflow.

I had hoped these capsules would replace my morning cafetière – I always manage to get grounds somewhere they shouldn’t be – but the taste is not right for me. I do like a small Nespresso after dinner. Although I am over-sensitive to most drugs and have to take my medicines in paediatric doses, caffeine has no effect on me – I don’t buzz and it doesn’t stop me sleeping. If I’m very tired I can go to bed straight after my expresso and still be asleep almost as soon as my head touches the pillow. Strange but true!!

Waterstones – Another Great London Bookstore

Waterstones Piccadilly
Waterstones Piccadilly

We always knew the building as Simpsons of Piccadilly where you went to buy posh clothes and DAKS trousers. Opened as a clothes store in 1936, it was sold to Waterstones in 1999, and is now their Flagship Store.

The competition
The competition: memoirs on display in Waterstones

I’ve had straight ‘no’s’ from four agents and two very nice rejections from two others. One said:

I’m afraid I concluded that while it is full of charm and interest, and is undoubtedly well written, I just don’t think it is quite strong enough overall to compete in the memoir market. But do try other agents, and if ultimately you draw a blank, I would encourage Abby to self-publish, as there is a lot of historical detail in her book and it would be nice if it entered the public domain. I was very pleased to have the chance to read A Woman in White and I wish  Abby every success with it.

When you look at the bios on display at Waterstones it’s obvious you need to be a celebrity or maybe a villain to be certain of publication.

Waiting on two more agents and if they say ‘no’ will go for e-publishing.