Tag Archives: Cooking

Scrumptious Rock Cakes – ‘Woman in a White Coat’ Memoir for Christmas

Delicious rock cakes

These Rock cakes are so easy and low sugar – none in the dough mixture and just a sprinkle of demerara sugar on the top to make them crunchy. And they freeze well – if you have any left once the family has seen them.

You can read about the cookery classes I went to at Morley College with Joyce. Thanks to her teaching I’m happy to tackle most recipes. Such a shame she died so soon after retiring.

Read about cookery and further education in my memoir Woman in a White Coat. It makes an excellent Christmas present.

The  paperback is available from Amazon at £9.99 or on Kindle at £2.99

Recipe for Rock Cakes
Continue reading Scrumptious Rock Cakes – ‘Woman in a White Coat’ Memoir for Christmas

Plum and Almond Cake (Waitrose) and Where I learned to Cook

Lovely mixture of sweet and sour

There are so many reasons – other than that I love them very much – why it’s so great when Louise and her family come and stay with us.

I’m always on and off slimming – all too soon I put back most of the weight I lost whilst on a ventilator two years ago after a major heart attack, so I don’t make desserts for just Joshua and me. Having visitors is a good excuse. The latest Waitrose Magazine came out with this recipe for Plum and Almond Cake just in time. Josh doesn’t like almond essence so I use vanilla essence instead.

When Josh and I got married in 1956 I could just about cook omelettes and minestrone. Over the next few years, whilst I was a Medical Student and then a House Officer, I gradually increased my repertoire but really learned to cook a wide variety of dishes at the excellent Good Housekeeping six-week full time course in 1960.

Listen to my account of that experience from my memoir Woman in a White Coat Chapter 14 Starting a Family Pages 247-249 and try the recipe given at the end of this post

You can purchase Woman in a White Coat on Kindle at £2.99 or search on ISBN 9781979834391 for the paperback version on Amazon at £9.99

Woman in a White Coat Chapter 14 Starting a Family Pages 247-249

By the time I finished my second house job, I was five months pregnant. I was unlikely to find a part-time temporary job in medicine and I couldn’t face the thought of standing all day in a dental practice.

I decided to take a cookery course instead. Only the girls in the lower streams at school did cookery and my mother had always shooed me away, especially during wartime. When we got married I could cook omelettes and minestrone and not much else, though I’d extended my range a bit since then.

‘Food is rationed,’ she’d say. ‘Don’t want you wasting good food. Time enough to learn to cook when you get married.’

My mother was a very plain cook. Her repertoire was limited to chicken soup, boiled chicken, braised beef, fried fish and sardines on toast. On Saturdays, we’d have cholent, potatoes and meat or chicken that had been cooking all night on a gas ring turned on very low before the Sabbath came in.

I saw an advertisement for a six-week full-time course at the Good Housekeeping Cookery School. The courses were originally designed for debutantes who needed to learn how to run a kitchen, though they might only set a foot inside one to give orders to the cook.

Most of the other students were upper crust young women who had hardly ever gone into a kitchen. One 17-year-old had never even peeled a potato. Some of the others had moved to London and got a flat of their own so they had done a bit of cooking but we were all pretty inexperienced. One student was a woman in her early thirties who had been in the ATS (Auxiliary Territorial Service) – someone more my age. We paired up and shared chores.

Before the war, the students would have cooked in the morning and learned about housework in the afternoon, though they might never have to do any housework once they were married. They were taught to use the starch-enriched water from soaking the potatoes they cooked in the morning to starch a frilly cap or a shirt; how to use gophering tongs – the tubular bladed instruments that made little tunnels in starched caps – and how to iron men’s shirts. By the time I took the course, it only covered cookery.

The kitchens were in a large basement in Mayfair. There were eight Formica-topped tables for the sixteen of us. The shelves around the walls were stacked with bowls and saucepans of every shape and size and there were drawers and drawers of cooking implements. as well as several gas cookers and hobs. On Mondays, the room smelled of cleaning fluid but the rest of the week we were greeted by the gorgeous smell of the cakes we’d cooked for our tea the day before.

We were taught from scratch – how to boil an egg, how to boil potatoes, how to skin and bone a fish. It was a mixture of traditional English cookery – roast beef, roast potatoes and Yorkshire pudding – and some more exotic dishes like dolmas (stuffed vine leaves), curries and the classic sole dishes Sole Veronique, sole with green grapes and Sole Meniere, sole panfried in butter.

In the mornings, we cooked a main meal for lunch and ate it – meat, fish or a vegetarian dish and two vegetables. In the afternoons we baked cakes, bread, brioches, and pastries. I adored it all, especially the chocolate éclairs. In 1960, no-one seemed to bother about pregnant women putting on too much weight and I ate for two with gusto.

I couldn’t find a suitable sized alphabetised book so I bought a linen covered book and made my own index. I still have it, a few food stains on the cover and the leaves a bit faded, but the recipes as good as ever.

The teachers were all highly experienced cooks and managed their often unruly pupils with ease. At dental and medical school, there had been few women – there was still a 10% quota for us. I thoroughly enjoyed the fun of bonding and giggling and having a great time in an all-female group.

I thrived on being pregnant, though I got a bit more tired than the others. It was a lovely six weeks. I cried when they gave me an embroidered layette at the end of the course.

Here is my slightly modified recipe: Continue reading Plum and Almond Cake (Waitrose) and Where I learned to Cook

Scrumptious Chocolate Muffins (Waitrose Magazine)

Absolutely delicious

Amongst the many great things about my daughter Louise visiting with her family is that I can try out new recipes, knowing that I have a ready and willing market. Luckily the Waitrose Food Magazine was just out.

These muffins are delicious although at first sight the recipe looks a bit odd – with yogurt and vegetable oil.

I used Green and Black’s Milk Chocolate and their Dark Orange and Almond Chocolate. The recipe asked for white and milk chocolate but i prefer dark chocolate. I’m sure any white and dark chocolate would do.

I am eternally grateful to Joyce, my fantastic cookery teacher at Morley College, for teaching me how to interpret and adjust magazine recipes  – Chapter 26 in Woman in a White Coat

My modified recipe

Makes 18 Continue reading Scrumptious Chocolate Muffins (Waitrose Magazine)

Mary Berry’s Orange Polenta Cake

Delicious

I can never resist Mary Berry’s new Cookbooks. There are always some new dishes I must try.

There are several recipes in her new Classic book  and it’s great to have a cake for our gluten-sensitive grandson.

This Orange Polenta Cake is delicious though i’d have been pushed to fit it into a 20cm cake tin. My 23cm springform tin was just right.

Cookery was amongst the several  Further Education classes I took after i retired as a consultant pathologist. Joyce was the best tutor by far. Not only were all her recipes tried and tested – foolproof – but I learnt how to follow and adapt recipes from all different sources.

Recipe Continue reading Mary Berry’s Orange Polenta Cake

Special Treats for the Family – Plum TrayBake

Daniels’s favourite

When my daughter, Louise, and her family come to England for the New Year, Easter and in August, I cook their favourite foods.

Daniel, as a strapping nearly 18-year old, loves desserts in general and Plum Traybake in particular. I can’t remember where the original recipe comes from but it’s one of those that work every time.

As well as Louise’s family, our elder son, Simon, and Bernard and his girlfriend, Jo, came to dinner. It was Josh’s turn to cook but I made the dessert while he cooked a vegetarian cottage pie – Bernard is a vegetarian.

And saw online that my memoir Woman in a White Coat is still selling well on Amazon. Thank you all.

Recipe for Plum Traybake Continue reading Special Treats for the Family – Plum TrayBake

Happy New Year – 2018

Fireworks on the London Eye New Year 2018

Happy New Year – and many more to come for all of you wonderful people who have been following my blog and reading my memoir ‘Woman in a White Coat.’

Always great having Louise and her family over from the Basque Country for the New Year and Simon and Bernard and his girlfriend coming to dinner tomorrow. Has to be vegetarian for Bernard and Josh is cooking vegetable cottage pie. I’m going to make the desert – Plum Traybake.

Louise made a great flyer to take to independent bookshops. A few have agreed to stock my book.

 

Two for Tea

Yummy – especially with a miniature of brandy poured over the bottom

Our elder son, Simon,  and his wife came to tea on their way to a party and I’m always glad of an excuse to bake a cake.

This fruit cake is one of my favourites. I always toss the fruit in a little of the flour so it doesn’t all sink to the bottom but is evenly distributed through the cake.

Design adapted from a panel by William de Morgan (1839-1917)

We’d been having a bit of a smashing time lately – sorting out the mugs chipped in the dishwasher and we’re always looking out for new designs. I found this one in the V&A gift shop when I last visited . The design is adapted from one of William de Morgan’s.

We have a full Thomas white china tea service but we’ve stopped getting it out even for our poshest visitors!!

Lots of lovely reviews and emails from readers of my memoir Woman in a White Coat. Please do comment or email me.

Beetroot (and caraway seed) Mini-loaves (Waitrose magazine)

Delicious little beetroot and caraway loaves

Josh and I take turns cooking dinner and on Tuesdays I cook and we always have soup, which is much nicer with home-made bread.

Sometimes we have slices of freshly made granary or wholemeal bread but there is something special about having individual mini-loaves. Josh doesn’t really care for caraway seeds so though these are delicious, next time I’ll leave out the caraway.

Recipe

I always mix my dough in my Panasonic breadmaker but prove and bake it in my electric fan oven, Continue reading Beetroot (and caraway seed) Mini-loaves (Waitrose magazine)

Parsnip and Pecan Loaf – Waitrose magazine

Delicious cake to have with tea or coffee

 

I always like the family coming to tea or coffee so I can try out new recipes.

 

One grandson can’t tolerate dairy produce and this Parsnip and Pecan Loaf cake from Waitrose magazine has vegetable oil instead of margarine or butter.

Their recipe has a topping which contains cream cheese so I substituted chopped pecans. In any case, it’s easier to freeze any that’s left over if it doesn’t have a thick fluffy topping.

You can read about how I learned to cook at a Cookery School for debutantes when I was 5 months pregnant in Chapter 19 of my memoir Woman in a White Coat

My slightly modified recipe

Continue reading Parsnip and Pecan Loaf – Waitrose magazine

Pear and Caramel Tarts for Dessert at a Lovely Family Dinner party

Delicious pear and Caramel Tart

Great having  the family to dinner – Louise over for the weekend from the Basque Country, Bernie newly with an MA with distinction and his girlfriend, and Simon and his wife.

Joshua made his delicious Fish Pie and I defrosted the Pear and Caramel tarts I tried out the week before. Josh will sometimes try a new recipe when we have guests but I’m too scared and prefer to try them out on the two of us first.

The recipe is from the Waitrose magazine and I have now modified it to make only 6 or 7 tarts. Mostly we are six for dinner and if I make the 12 in the original recipe it would mean freezing some. Better to have something different next time.

My Modified Recipe Continue reading Pear and Caramel Tarts for Dessert at a Lovely Family Dinner party