Tag Archives: Flowers

I shall wear purple ….

Pericallis Senetti in the courtyard to our flats

As I walked past the purple CinerariaPericallis Senetti – the gardeners had newly planted in our courtyard, I was reminded of Jenny Joseph’s poem Warning

‘When I am an old woman I shall wear purple
With a red hat that doesn’t go, and doesn’t suit me
. . . . ‘

Like everyone who voted it Britain’s favourite poem in 1996, I’ve always liked it, especially now I’ve grown old myself.

However, alhough purple is my favourite colour, the only purple garment I have is a Marks and Spencer purple button-to-the neck cardigan. Perhaps it’s time to go shopping for purple.

Delighted to get back another speedy and positive review of Chapter 1 of my memoir Woman in a White Coat. Thank you N.

Email me at abby(Replace this parenthesis with the @ sign)abbyjw.com to be sent the first chapter of Woman in a White Coat. If you comment, I will send you another. Look forward to hearing  from you.

The Sweet Scent of Jasmine

Just coming into bloom

After my major heart attack last August, I lost most of my sense of smell and taste, so I was delighted to walk past the railings on the approach to Morley College to be greeted by this sweet familiar scent coming from the jasmine bushes planted behind the railings. They were just coming into bloom and I realised that my sense of smell was coming back.

The scent brought back memories of the small house we had from 1993-2003 in Nerja in the South of Spain. We had planted night-scented jasmine on our terrace and the scent would waft across as we sat drinking our after dinner coffee.

Sweet memories indeed!!

Beyond Caravaggio – National Gallery, London

Beyond Caravaggio exhibition

I have been feeling guilty that after my heart attack I haven’t felt motivated or well enough to visit some of the great exhibitions presently on in London but I’m slowly catching up.

Last Sunday we went to see Beyond Caravaggio at the National Gallery in Trafalgar Square, London – an exhibition showing his far reaching influence on artists of his time. It’s interesting that without having his own school, Caravaggio’s style was taken up by so many painters, though he hated being copied and would threaten to beat up anyone who did so.

Boy with basket of Fruit

After 20 or so years his combination of live models, dramatic lighting (chiaroscuro) and storytelling fell out of favour until the 20th century, since when he has been increasingly popular.

Caravaggio  (1571-1610) said that painting still life requires as much artistry as painting figure and his still lifes were certainly beautiful. The boy with fruit and flowers in the exhibition was his rather naughty Boy bitten by a lizard 1594-5 which shows a lizard biting the boy’s middle finger with beautifully painted fruit and white roses in a glass vase and behind the boy’s ear.

Georgia O’Keefe and Bhupen Khakhar at Tate Modern, London

One of my favourite flower paintings by O'Keeffe
One of my favourite flower paintings by O’Keeffe

I wish I’d seen the BBC1 Imagine program – Georgia O’Keeffe by Myself – before I went to the Tate exhibition. From the poster I had expected to see lots of her flower paintings which I’ve always liked, but there were only two and though I very much liked New York Street with Moon, her Lake George paintings and her paintings of skulls and bones, the exhibition lacked the coherence of the TV program. The exhibition seemed bitty to me, but having watched the program and seen how her art evolved, I appreciate her non-flower works much more. It would be good to visit the exhibition again but there are so many good things to see in London just now, I am unlikely to make it.

One of Khakar's fleshy nudes
One of Khakar’s fleshy nudes

The other works on the same floor were by the Indian painter Bhupen Khakhar. Josh and I both particularly loved the deep blues and greens of the paintings in the first room. A sad man,  plagued by living in a world where his sexuality was forbidden, much of his work is related to his homosexuality. Rich vibrant colours and often moving, I much preferred it to the Georgia O’Keeffe, with the caveat that if I had time to go back I might well revise my opinion of the exhibition of her work.

Unfortunately, or fortunately, we were too tired after visiting both exhibitions in one morning to tour the new Modern Art Wing of Tate Modern. Another day.

There’s a bird nesting in our window box

Window box in the courtyard
Window box in the courtyard

We’ve had Mallard ducks on our 9th floor balcony and a peregrine and we can hear the blackbirds singing from their nest above us. Once a pair of ducks nested on the roof opposite and raised a family of ducklings there.

Sparrow's eggs?
Sparrow’s eggs?

Now a small bird has made a nest in our courtyard and laid five eggs. It seems amazing. The new gardeners only replanted the window box quite recently.

I caught a glimpse of a little brown bird flying away as I walked past but I’m not sure what type it was.

A neighbour said it was a robin, but surely they have blue eggs?

BLUEBELLS BEHIND BARS

Bluebells in Central London
Bluebells in Central London

I’m used to seeing bluebells in a more natural habitat – in a bosky wood. But here they are in the patch of ground surrounding this Victorian block of flats in Westminster.

I don’t usually walk this way, though I sometimes park in the Disabled bay further along the street. I was delighted to see this flash of colour,  a reminder that Spring has finally come.

When I’ve walked past before, the area in front of the apartments has been a mixture of tangled greenery interspersed with areas of dry earth. Lovely to be cheered up on my walk back from the bank.